Cause of Death: Boredom

bored

When was the last time you were bored? Sitting at a red traffic light waiting for it to turn? Waiting in line at the coffee shop? Now more than ever, teenagers and adults are unable to deal with brief periods of boredom without pulling out their phones to open an app. In a world of more information than ever before, the boredom epidemic is growing.

Our Minds Are More Active Than Ever

The boredom epidemic has its roots in our smartphones and all of the technology around us. Because we are regularly exposed to so much media and entertainment, our baseline for what is entertaining is incredibly high. Just like with anything else that is stimulating, the more that we are entertained, the more entertainment we require to truly feel occupied. Since we are so accustomed to constant activity, even minor periods of downtime (like waiting in line at the grocery store) can feel like an eternity.

It’s Easy to Get Bored

Paradoxically, too much freedom and too many choices can lead to boredom and indecision. In a world where you can access hundreds of thousands of movies, songs and books from the comfort of your home, why should you ever leave? Forsaking social interaction and boredom for constant low-level mental stimulation can actually lead to more boredom.

Boredom Is an Essential Part of Life

Why is the boredom epidemic such a bad thing? Isn’t it good that we are being so productive with our limited time? Boredom is actually an essential part of creativity and life. When you had nothing to do as a child, that was when you dreamt up other worlds, created imaginary stories with friends and learned to problem solve. The same thing is true for adults. Boredom is the fuel that will feed your creativity and happiness. Reclaim your boredom and you will start to see imaginative new thoughts slowly replacing the space of your brain currently occupied by Candy Crush.

Get in Touch

Need extra help reclaiming your boredom or living without your phone? Contact CBT Baltimore to get on the right track at 443-470-9815.